The government is trying to take away your right to free or affordable legal representation if you’re injured

Currently…

If you are injured and it’s not your fault any legal fees, for a lawyer to fight for you to get back any wages you have lost and damages for your injuries, are paid by the person responsible for your injuries.
This is your right.

But soon…

The government and insurance companies plan to strip you of this right by increasing the small claims limit.* If your injury claim falls below the new small claims limit, you will have to pay for your own legal fees.

In future…

If you are a victim of injury – on the road, but also at work or anywhere else – you will have to pay for the legal help you need, and deserve, from your compensation or fight the insurers on your own in your own time.

Who is really benefiting?

 If these reforms go ahead insurers are set to profit from an additional £200 million per year. This is on top of already vastly over-inflated salaries. In 2015, the then CEOs of four insurance companies received packages ranging from £4.55 million to £11.55 million.
...

David Stevens, CEO

£11.55m

...

Henri de Castries, Former CEO

£4.55m*

...

Mark Wilson, CEO

£5.67m

...

Paul Geddes, CEO

£4.82m

For more details go to http://www.feedingfatcats.co.uk

Take action! How can you try and stop this?

By letting the government know that you are against these changes, you can help to prevent nearly one million people a year from losing their right to legal protection.

Lobby Liz

Click here to send an automated tweet to Liz Truss, Secretary of State for (In)Justice, saying that you are against the government’s proposals.

Write to your MP

Click here to send a pre-drafted email to your MP, opposing the changes to the small claims limit. Simply copy and paste the content into your email client.

You can find the contact details for your local MP here.

Sign the e-petition

Sign the e-petition ‘Keep the Personal Injury Small Claims Limit at £1,000.’

At 10,000 signatures, the government will respond to the petition.

At 100,000 signatures, the petition will be considered for debate in Parliament.

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